A History of Activism Through Cookbooks

Tuesday, 05 Mar 2024 at 6:00 pm – Sun Room, Memorial Union

Food has often been a way for activist communities to fundraise, connect, and spread the workl about their cause. Sarah Lohman will explore the origins of the link between food and activism with the abolitionist food writers of the Civil War; unpack suffrage cookbooks from the turn of the 20th century; share the earliest LGBTQ cooking pamphlets from the 1960s; and talk about how food is still used to connect and advocate for causes today.Sarah Lohman is originally from Cleveland, Ohio, where she began working in a museum at age 16, cooking historical food over a woodburning stove. She moved to New York in 2006 to work for New York Magazine's food blog, "Grub Street," and now works with museums and galleries around the city to create public programs focused on food. Lohman is the author of Eight Flavors and Endangered Eating: America's Vanishing Foods.The ISU Book Store will be at the event selling copies of the speaker's book.This lecture will be recorded and available to view within 24-36 hours after its conclusion on the Available Recordings page.
Food has often been a way for activist communities to fundraise, connect, and spread the workl about their cause. Sarah Lohman will explore the origins of the link between food and activism with the abolitionist food writers of the Civil War; unpack suffrage cookbooks from the turn of the 20th century; share the earliest LGBTQ cooking pamphlets from the 1960s; and talk about how food is still used to connect and advocate for causes today.Sarah Lohman is originally from Cleveland, Ohio, where she began working in a museum at age 16, cooking historical food over a woodburning stove. She moved to New York in 2006 to work for New York Magazine's food blog, "Grub Street," and now works with museums and galleries around the city to create public programs focused on food. Lohman is the author of Eight Flavors and Endangered Eating: America's Vanishing Foods.The ISU Book Store will be at the event selling copies of the speaker's book.This lecture will be recorded and available to view within 24-36 hours after its conclusion on the Available Recordings page.

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